Casa Terracota is located in Villa de Leyva, a mountain village 95 miles north of Bogota, Colombia. It was built by Colombian architect, Octavio Mendoza. The house is built entirely of clay and baked in the sun, not using steel, cement or other reinforced materials. The house is 5,400 ft2 (502 m2).

The two-story house with a sleeping area is fitted with beds, tables and chairs that are also made of local clay and baked in a kiln. There is a fully equipped kitchen such as dishes, jars, and jars all made of clay. The house uses solar panels to heat up, toilets and bathroom sinks are decorated with colorful mosaic tiles.

Mendoza, who has spent most of her career designing houses, buildings and churches, calls a clay house a project for life. Mendoza’s goal, he said, is to demonstrate how land can be turned into habitable architecture.

In addition, there is another clay house in Vietnam. The owner is Mr. Nguyen Van Buol, an artisan with nearly 30 years in pottery. With the superficial, solid and red natural eye-catching few people know that the house is built from 90% clay materials. Determined to revive a traditional village of the area at risk of disappearance, a brick-ceramic house also formed from there. To him, it is not simply a love of pottery, but he also wants to prove that the old red color will once be a new artistic color for the houses of South Vietnam.

Talking to reporters and artisans in ceramics, it took him nearly ten years to build ideas and prepare materials for a house as magnificent and solid as now.

Not only did he design the drawing himself, he calculated the technical factors himself, Mr. Buôl also sketched each art detail by himself without going to any school. The difficulty is that everything must be aligned so that the material is still raw clay.

It was not until mid-2018 that a red ceramic house made of baked clay was formed. Thanks to taking advantage of the pre-made materials, in just 3 months the house made of baked clay with an area of 300m2 has assembled the frame.